Exerted effort and performance in climbing among boys: the influence of achievement goals, perceived ability, and task difficulty.

authors

  • Sarrazin Philippe
  • Roberts Glyn
  • Cury François
  • Biddle Stuart
  • Famose Jean-Pierre

keywords

  • Achievement motivation
  • Goals
  • Ego
  • Task
  • Effort
  • Climbing

document type

ART

abstract

In achievement contexts such as sport, achievement goal theory assumes that an individual's major concern is to demonstrate competence. However, competence may be expressed in two ways: as task and ego involvement (Nicholls, 1989). Seventy-eight boys (M age = 13.6 years) performed five climbing courses, and the influence of achievement goals, perceived ability, and task difficulty on effort and performance was studied. According to the achievement goal theory: (a) task-involved boys exerted more effort and performed better than ego-involved boys; and (b) exerted effort was determined by an interaction of one's achievement goal, perceived ability (PA), and task difficulty. Ego-high PA boys and task-low PA boys exerted the most effort on the moderate course; ego-low PA boys exerted least effort on the moderate and very difficult courses. Finally, task-high PA boys exerted more effort on the most difficult courses. The motivational processes underlying these findings are discussed.

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